B56 Mini Interviews with S L Huang, Brendan DuBois & Josh Dahl

The countdown to Boskone 56 is on! Alas, it brings us the last set of mini interviews for this year. Don’t fret! Come to Boskone to meet all our talented program participants, including S L Huang, Brendan DuBois & Josh Dahl.

 

SL HuangS L Huang

SL Huang is an Amazon-bestselling author who justifies her MIT degree by using it to write eccentric mathematical superhero fiction. Her debut novel, Zero Sum Game, came out from Tor in 2018, and her short fiction has sold to Analog, Nature, and The Best American Science Fiction & Fantasy 2016. She is also a Hollywood stuntwoman and firearms expert, where she’s appeared on shows such as “Battlestar Galactica” and “Raising Hope” and worked with actors such as Sean Patrick Flanery, Jason Momoa, and Danny Glover. She currently lives in Tokyo.

Visit Lisa on Facebook, Twitter or via her website.

With many conventions to choose from and limited time in your schedule, what attracts you to Boskone?

I’ve never been to Boskone, but I was very attracted to it because — BOSTON! I love Boston. I went to college there, and I feel a great nostalgia for the literary and genre people I met during my years in the area. And every time I go back to visit friends, I’m delighted by the vibrancy and brilliance of Boston communities.

I’m eager to catch up with friends and meet more locals, as well as hang with the other folks traveling in for the con. I can’t imagine a better city to do it in, and the more I interact with the Boskone community in particular and hear about how the convention is run, the more excited I am to experience it for myself. My publisher was stoked at the idea of my attending Boskone, too!

 

Do you have a favorite photo from a book event or literary convention? If so, when and where was it taken? What do you enjoy most about this photo?

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“I DO. And it’s a Boston photo, no less!

Ken Liu, Elizabeth Bear, and I were all in MIT Press’s “Twelve Tomorrows” anthology together, and this photo is when we came to do a Q&A at the MIT Press Bookstore last year. It was one of the most fun events I’ve done, mainly because Ken and Elizabeth are utterly delightful people. As you can see from this photo — I don’t know what Ken said that made us laugh this hard!

We talked some of my favorite topics with the audience, such as hard science fiction and the science behind our favorite SF. Like every time I’ve been in Boston, the audience members were smart and responsive and so fun to engage with, and as an MIT alum myself I was over the moon to return to the bookstore as an author. Now, every time I see this photo it reminds me of what a giddily good time we had there — and how much fun talking science and science fiction can be.

Plus, the dress I am wearing in this picture is awesome. It has POCKETS.

Can you share some details about upcoming projects or what you’re working on now? Do you have releases in 2019 that readers should look for?
NULL-SET-cover-674x1024Yes, I have two upcoming releases that I’m very excited about! Yoon Ha Lee, Rivers Solomon, Becky Chambers and I have a collaborative series coming out very soon from Serial Box. It’s called The Vela, and it’s a space opera adventure that also digs into some deep themes. You can read more about it here: https://www.serialbox.com/serials/vela

Then my second book, Null Set, is coming out this summer. It’s the sequel to my debut novel Zero Sum Game, which my publisher calls “the geek’s Jack Reacher” — it’s about a superheroine who can do math really, really fast. She does use to kill slightly too many people . . . but I still love her.

 

brendanduboisBrendan DuBois

Brendan DuBois of New Hampshire is the award-winning author of 22 novels and more than 170 short stories. His third science fiction novel, BLACK TRIUMPH — the concluding novel in his DARK VICTORY trilogy — was published in October 2018 by Baen Books. This March, two novels co-authored with NYT bestselling author James Patterson — THE FIRST LADY and THE CORNWALLS ARE GONE — will be published. His short fiction has appeared in Playboy, Analog, Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, and numerous anthologies including “The Best American Mystery Stories of the Century,” published in 2000, as well as the “The Best American Noir of the Century,” published in 2010. Two of his short stories have appeared in Gardner Dozois’ “The Year’s Best Science Fiction” anthologies. His novel, RESURRECTION DAY, won the Sidewise Award for Best Alternate History Novel of the Year. His stories have thrice won him the Shamus Award from the Private Eye Writers of America, and have also earned him three Edgar Allan Poe Award nominations from the Mystery Writers of America. He is also a “Jeopardy!” gameshow champion.

Visit Brendan on Facebook or via his website.

With many conventions to choose from and limited time in your schedule, what attracts you to Boskone?

Well, it’s an hour’s drive away, which is nice. Hah-hah. No, what appeals to me is nostalgia and the future. Nostalgia because I was a fierce SF fan back in the 1970s, in grade school and high school. In 1977, as a senior in high school, Boskone was my very first convention of any kind, and I was instantly welcomed. That’s the nostalgia part. After a decades-long absence, and with me re-entering the SF and fantasy field as an author, I find Boskone just as open, warm, and welcoming. It still honors its roots in SF and fantasy, and also promotes the future and changing field of which I have so much affection.

If you could relive your first experience with any book or film, which one would you pick? What is it about this book or film that you want to experience again for the “first time?”

The book would be Robert Heinlein’s Red Planet, first published in 1949. I probably read this book about 20 or so years later, as a young boy, and it was just a wonderful introduction of a YA type of SF where young boys were the lead. Of course, *I* imagined myself as a young lad on Mars… and that (along with the Apollo space program) just fed my life-long love with SF and space.

What is your favorite memory of a fan interaction at a convention? It could be you as a pro interacting with one of your fans or you as a fan meeting someone you admire.

This is a story I’ve told many, many times before, so please forgive me. As noted earlier, back in 1977 I was a high school senior, in love with writing and science fiction. My parents actually allowed me to go to my first SF convention in Boston, Boskone, about an hour away form home.

I was alone. Didn’t know a soul. But at some reception I fell into conversation with the one and only David Gerrold. We talked for a while and I couldn’t believe how cool this was… me, a kid from New Hampshire, sharing time with the guy who wrote the Tribbles episode and so much other cool stuff.

Later on, he said, “I’ve having dinner with Larry and his wife. Want to join us?”

I said sure. “Larry” turned out to be SF author Larry Niven and his wife Marilyn, a/k/a Fuzzy Pink.

So there I was, the first day of my first SF con, having an intelligent and lovely dinner with two of the greats in SF. They treated me as an equal, as someone who would be a pro “one of these days.” And that dinner at Boskone changed my life, and gave me the inspiration and dedication to continue writing, as a journalist and then a full-time fiction author in 1998.

Do you have a favorite photo from a book event or literary convention? If so, when and where was it taken? What do you enjoy most about this photo?

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This photo was taken at Bouchercon in 2016, when I met up with David Gerrold for the first time since 1977. I’m holding an autographed PB from him that was published at that time, and *he’s* holding an autographed copy of my first novel. The circle closes…

 

 

Can you share some details about upcoming projects or what you’re working on now? 

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Last fall, I completed the third novel in my first science fiction trilogy, Black Triumph,  which was published by Baen Books.Next month, my first collaboration with James Patterson, The Cornwalls Are Gone, will be released by Little, Brown.

 

 

 

Who is your favorite literary character of all time? What is it about this character that you admire?
Oh, it would have to be Lazarus Long, the creation of Robert Heinlein, who “lived” in works published in the 1940’s, 1970’s and 1980’s. In these fictional worlds, he lived for several thousand years, through various timelines. See: Methuselah’s Children, Time Enough For Love, The Cat Who Walks Through Walls, and To Sail Beyond The Sunset.

 

joshdahl

Josh Dahl

Visit Josh on Facebook or via his website.

With many conventions to choose from and limited time in your schedule, what attracts you to Boskone?

Boskone is both low-key, but intense. It is smart, but silly. It is intriguing, but inviting. It’s fun.

They say you can find hints of creators in their work. Looking back at your work, which character, piece of art, song, poem, article, etc. most closely resembles you? Why?

All of my comics are really about me, but the one that is most clearly autobiographical is Rapid City: Objects at Rest.

What is your favorite memory of a fan interaction at a convention? It could be you as a pro interacting with one of your fans or you as a fan meeting someone you admire.

I was sipping my second sad-and-alone gin n tonic at the Comixology after-party for New York Comic Con. I didn’t know anyone there and was ready to mope back to my room. Just then, a mysterious woman cut through the crowd, moving directly toward me. She looked up at me and said “Are you Josh Dahl? You are one of my favorite writers”.
I won’t get into the specifics after that, suffice it to say that we played a few rounds of trivia with her friends. It was wonderful.

Can you share some details about upcoming projects or what you’re working on now? Do you have releases in 2019 that readers should look for?
Skies Over Superior is an ongoing comic series with artist Laura Bearl. Teenager Merilee Fit discovers that mythical creatures are arising from Lake Superior to destroy her northern Michigan town… and all of humanity. It is up to Merilee and her uncle to find a way to stop them. This serialized graphic novel is supported by Patreon and available through Tapas.

 

 

 

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Check out Boskone for Free

As a fan (volunteer) run convention, we work hard to give our program participants and attendees the best experience.We understand that conventions can be daunting. We created Free Friday Afternoon programming to give you a taste of what you can expect at Boskone before you buy a membership.

 

Free Friday Afternoon Programming

Programming on Friday, February 15th is (free to the public) from 2:00-6:00 pm. Memberships are required after 6:00 pm on Friday and throughout the rest of the convention.

  • Events 
    • Special Interview with The Worlds of Ursula K. Le Guin Director Arwen Curry
    • Young Adult Fiction Guest Interview: Cindy Pon
  • Panels include
    • The Hopeful Future in Science Fiction
    • The Other Others in Urban Fantasy
    • Your Own Doomsday: Speculating on Future Catastrophes
    • Heinlein’s Juveniles
    • The Life Cycle of a Book
    • Medical Ethics in the 21st Century
    • Laundering Your Fairy Tales
    • MG or YA?
    • My Worst Story — And Why I Wrote It
    • The Long View (of a Writing Career)
    • The Perfect Short Story
  • Workshops include
    • How to Create Your Own Book Trailer
    • Dialog Workshop: You Don’t Say!
    • Telling Tarot Tales

These are just a few of our Free Friday Afternoon program items. There is so much more to enjoy at Boskone this year! Check out Boskone 56’s full program schedule to see what else is in store for you.

After 6:00 pm on Friday and through the rest of the convention, you’ll need to purchase a membership to stay and enjoy the events, panels, interviews, games, and more! Weekend passes as well as day passes are available.

Come early, stay late, and return for more. It all begins at 2:00 pm on Friday, February 15. See you there!

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A “Must See” Special Exhibit at Boskone 56 Art Show

Boskone is known for its Art Show,  in large part that is due to the incredible (and often Herculean) work done by Joe Siclari and Edie Stern. Join us for one last special exhibit from Joe and Edie featuring their favorite pieces that have not been shown at a Boskone before.

Over the last 15 years, Joe Siclari and Edie Stern have put together over a dozen Historical Art Retrospectives for Boskone and World Fantasy Conventions. They have compiled some of the most interesting and engaging speculative art exhibits in fandom that showed the growth of the art in science fiction and fantasy. These exhibits were put together with contributions from dozens of collectors and artists, as well as from their own collections. Their special exhibits have been special gems in the Boskone experience and you won’t want to miss out on this, their final Boskone exhibit.

 

Special Exhibit: From the Collection of Joe Siclari and Edie Stern

This special exhibit will feature approximately 40 pieces, ranging from early 1900s to early this century and includes some of the greatest artists in the genre, both classical and contemporary. Some of the artists represented in the show include Julie Bell, Hannes Bok, Chesley Bonestell, Margaret Brundage, Vincent Di Fate, Leo and Diane Dillon, Dean Ellis, Ed Emsh, Robert Foster, Kelly Freas, John Harris, Paul Lehr, Ian Miller, John Jude Palencar, Willy Pogany, Richard Powers, John Schoenherr, Lawrence Sterne Stevens, Jean Pierre Targete, H. R. Van Dongen, Boris Vallejo, Ron Walotsky and Gahan Wilson.

We hope you enjoy this exhibit. Come stop by, say hello, and thank them for the years-and-years of amazing work they have contributed to Boskone! To learn more about the art, join them on their docent tour on Saturday at 4pm.

 

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Buy your Boskone 56 Membership Before Online Sales Close

If you still need to purchase your membership, it’s easy! Pre-convention full weekend and one-day membership rates are available online through Saturday, February 9, 2019. To pick up your name badge and convention materials, come to Registration at the top of the escalator in the Harbor Foyer area. 

On-Site Registration Hours

  • Friday:  1:00 pm – 8:30 pm
  • Saturday:  9:00 am – 6:00 pm
  • Sunday:  9:00 am – 12:00 noon

Full Weekend Rates

Adult Day Rates:

College Day Rates: (school ID may be required)

  • Friday: $20
  • Saturday: $40
  • Sunday: $20

Student K-12 Day Rates: (school ID may be required)

  • Friday: $10
  • Saturday: $20
  • Sunday: $10

Memberships for Children

All children (ages 7–12) who use Dragonslair services must be convention members. However, children who stay with their parents at all times are considered “kids-in-tow,” and need not have memberships. (“Kids-in-tow” do not receive any convention materials.) We are not able to offer babysitting through the convention.

At-Convention Membership Purchase

If you miss the online registration window, don’t worry! You can still purchase your membership at Boskone. Registration opens at 1:00 pm on Friday, February 15th. Don’t forget to bring a government-issued or school-issued photo-ID, such as a driver’s license, with you to pick up your badge.

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B56 Mini Interviews with Gerald Coleman, Leigh Perry & Daniel M. Kimmel

Happy Wednesday, Boskone fans! With only a week to go, are you ready to meet some of our fabulous program participants? Grab a coffee and read on!

 

Gerald L. Coleman

m5AO_29012Gerald L. Coleman is a Philosopher, Theologian, Poet, and Author residing in Atlanta. Born in Lexington, he did his undergraduate work in Philosophy and English at the University of Kentucky. He followed that by completing a degree in Religious Studies, concluding with a Master’s degree in Theology at Trevecca Nazarene University in Nashville. His most recent poetry appears in, Pluck! The Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture, Drawn To Marvel: Poems From The Comic Books, Pine Mountain Sand & Gravel Vol. 18, Black Bone Anthology, the 10th Anniversary Issue of Diode Poetry Journal, and About Place Journal. He is a speculative fiction author with short stories published in these Anthologies: The Science Fiction, Cyberfunk Anthology: The City, the Rococoa Anthology by Roaring Lion, Terminus Urban Fantasy Anthology, and the Dark Universe: Bright Empire. He is the author of the Epic Fantasy novel saga, The Three Gifts, which currently includes When Night Falls  (Book One) and A Plague of Shadows (Book Two). He has been a Guest Author and Attending Professional at DragonCon, Boskone, Blacktasticon, JordanCon, Atlanta Science Fiction & Fantasy Expo, The Outer Dark Symposium, World Horror Con, and Imaginarium. He has recently joined the staff of WorldCon Dublin as its Programme Content Consultant, and Multiverse Con as a Director in programming. He is a co-founder of the Affrilachian Poets and has released three collections of poetry entitled the road is long, falling to earth, and microphone check.

Visit Gerald on Facebook, Twitter or via his website.

With many conventions to choose from and limited time in your schedule, what attracts you to Boskone?

As an African American author you have to choose conventions wisely. The fandom, Con, scifi/fantasy community is just a microcosm of the broader culture – though we’d like to think we are special. As a consequence, the same cultural and social problems that exist in the broader culture also exist in our community. So, you have to do some real research about conventions before you agree to go. Who are the guests? Who is on the staff? What are the topics being discussed? What’s the harassment policy? Is that policy enforced? If you don’t you can very easily end up on a panel with someone who doesn’t think you should even be a part of science fiction and fantasy. You may be subjected to bias, prejudice, or outright racist ideas and behavior. I have had the experience of being on a panel and having a panelist claim that people of color don’t experience racism or disadvantages and other nonsensical and ugly behavior. So, you have to really screen potential Cons to be sure that if you go you aren’t going to be subjected to an unwelcoming environment.

This will be my second year at Boskone. I’m returning because Boskone was incredibly welcoming from the moment I arrived and I was able to just relax and enjoy fandom and all its wonderful attributes without the specter of prejudice, racism, or privilege. My fellow panelists were insightful and engaging and I had some of the most intellectually stimulating conversations about SFF that I’ve ever had. Boskone seems committed to creating an environment where bias, prejudice, and racism are not welcome. They seem to understand that it?s important that we all get to play. These are just a few of the reasons Boskone is at the top of my list for Cons to attend.

If you could relive your first experience with any book or film, which one would you pick? What is it about this book or film that you want to experience again for the “first time?”

There are so many. The first time I discovered science fiction and fantasy and realized there were thousands of books to read is one of the moments. Standing in the SFF section of my local bookstore as a 13 year old and seeing all the adventures I could go was like being a kid on Christmas morning. Seeing Dune, The Faded Sun series, The Black Company, Elric Of Melniboné and so many others just sitting on the shelf waiting is an indelible moment in my memory. Seeing The Matrix was another one. I had seen a trailer but was really fuzzy about what the movie was about. Sitting in the theater and experiencing it for the first time was just so delicious. I didn’t want it to end.

What is your favorite memory of a fan interaction at a convention? It could be you as a pro interacting with one of your fans or you as a fan meeting someone you admire.

This wasn’t actually a fan interaction in my book, but it’s an interaction I’ll never forget. I was sitting at a table at JordanCon selling books. It was the first book in my fantasy series, When Night Falls. A woman saw the poster with my book cover on it, looked at me, and approached my table. We smiled and said hello. She picked up the book and gave it a thorough examination. I sat quietly and gave her the space to do that and waited to answer any questions she had. When she finished, she placed the book back on the table and said, “One day they’ll be lined up around the block to get you to sign your books.” I thanked her for her kind words, we smiled at each other and she walked off into the convention. I didn’t think much about it, you often get people who are just browsing and that’s completely ok. It was only later after seeing her and someone pointed to her and mentioned her in a conversation that I realized it was Harriet McDougal, the wife of and editor for, Robert Jordan the author of The Wheel Of Time series. It was like being given a blessing and an affirmation that my work was good enough to be in the company of the best fantasy of my generation.

Can you share some details about upcoming projects or what you’re working on now?

I am currently working on a science fiction novel about a young black woman. Think: Shuri from Black Panther, Rey from Star Wars, and the 13th Doctor, mixed together. I am also working on book three in my fantasy series, The Three Gifts.

 

lperry

Leigh Perry (Toni L.P. Kelner)

Leigh Perry is two authors in one. As Leigh, she writes the Family Skeleton series about an adjunct English professor who solves mysteries with her best friend, Sid, an ambulatory skeleton. The Skeleton Makes a Friend is the most recent. As Toni L.P. Kelner, she’s the author of eleven novels: eight Laura Fleming mysteries and three “Where are they now?” mysteries, and has published a number of short stories. Along with New York Times bestseller Charlaine Harris, she co-edited a series of bestselling urban fantasy anthologies. She won the Agatha Award for Best Short Story for “Sleeping With The Plush,” and a RT BOOKreviews Career Achievement Award for Mystery Series. She’s also been nominated for the Anthony, the Macavity, and the Derringer awards. Leigh and her husband, fellow author Stephen P. Kelner, live north of Boston with one of the daughters, a guinea pig named Clara and a whole lot of books.

Visit her on Facebook, Twitter or via her website.

With many conventions to choose from and limited time in your schedule, what attracts you to Boskone?

Boskone has everything that first attracted me to science fiction: books, science, art, more books, discussions of other genres, SF and fantasy movies, still more books, short stories, history. And of course, books.

They say you can find hints of creators in their work. Looking back at your work, which character, piece of art, song, poem, article, etc. most closely resembles you? Why?

My three series characters are kind of like snapshots of me. The Laura Fleming series–books about a Southerner who moved to Massachusetts–reflect me as I was when I started writing the series: young, married, no children yet, working hard to develop an identity, and trying reconcile myself with being part of an extended family when I didn’t feel all that comfortable with them. The “Where are they now?” series–books about a freelance entertainment reporter fascinated by the formerly famous–showed my snarky side, my new identity as a New Englander, and the ambition. The Family Skeleton series–what I’m writing now–are about an older character with a daughter who is an amalgam of my own girls, still trying to decide what’s most important in her life. So me again!

What is your favorite memory of a fan interaction at a convention? It could be you as a pro interacting with one of your fans or you as a fan meeting someone you admire.

Years ago, when my second book had just come out, I was at a mystery convention chatting with Charlaine Harris, when she was pretty well established in mystery circles but not the publishing juggernaut she is today. A fan walked up and started telling Charlaine how much she like her books. Then she looked at my author tag, and said, “I don’t know you.” Charlaine, with the grace for which she is known, introduced me, described my books, and recommended them highly. The fan did not look convinced. But later on in the weekend, she sought me out and said, “I bought your book and started to read it. It’s pretty good.”

This represents everything about being a writer: 1) There’s always going to be writers more successful than I am. 2) The nicest writers are always willing to help out a newbie. 3) Fans can be single-minded in their adoration. and 4) The best fans are always interested in finding new stuff.

Do you have a favorite photo from a book event or literary convention? If so, when and where was it taken? What do you enjoy most about this photo?

Agatha BanquetIn 2015 I was Toastmaster at Malice Domestic, and it was truly one of the best weekends of my professional life. This picture shows me with the giant teacup which is given to toastmasters, which now lives in glory on my mantel, and me with my family. For us, conventions are a family affair: this is my daughter Maggie, me, my daughter Valerie, and my husband Steve. (The rogue hand on the left is my agent, Joshua Bilmes, adding to the gaiety.) There are better pictures of the four of us all dressed up, but this one is a perfect illustration of how we roll.

Can you share some details about upcoming projects or what you’re working on now? Do you have releases in 2019 that readers should look for?

I’m working on a new book for Diversion Books, but they’ve asked me not to say what it’s going to be quiet yet. (If you hit me up at the bar, I might give you a hint.)

 

dkimmelDaniel M. Kimmel

Veteran film critic Daniel M. Kimmel is the author of the Hugo nominated collection of essays “Jar Jar Binks Must Die.” He has branched out into humorous SF/F and has had a number of short stories published as well as three novels, the most recent of which is “Father of the Bride of Frankenstein.”

Visit Daniel on Facebook, Twitter or via his website.

Can you share some details about upcoming projects or what you’re working on now? Do you have releases in 2019 that readers should look for?

My latest comic novel, Father of the Bride of Frankenstein, comes out in January and will be available at Boskone. I also have a half dozen short stories currently set for publication, with stories in the second issue of AMAZING stories, “Release the Virgins” (Fantastic Books), “End Games” (B Cubed Press), and “Transcendence” (Transmundane Press) likely to be out by Boskone.

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Books! Swag! Fun! Come to the Boskone Book Party!

A great way to unwind on Boskone Saturday night is the Boskone Book Party! Enjoy this low-key meeting of the presses and authors who have new books coming out at Boskone! This is your chance to see what’s new from authors you already love as well as those you have yet to discover. Plus, there’s cake!

The Boskone 56 Book Party

Day: Saturday, February 16th
Time: 6:30-7:30 pm
Location: Con Suite, in the Galleria Level, Westin Waterfront Hotel

Book Party Authors:

  • Brenda W. Clough
  • Steve Davidson
  • Isadora Deese
  • Julie C. Day
  • Karen Heuler
  • Jeff Hecht
  • Grady Hendrix
  • S.L. Huang
  • KJ Kabza
  • Cerece Rennie Murphy
  • Suzanne Palmer
  • Christopher Paniccia
  • Kenneth Rogers Jr.
  • Clea Simon
  • Jane Yolen & Adam Stemple
  • Clarence Young

NESFA Press is pleased to announce the publication of the Boskone 56 book On the Road with Gardner Dozois: Travel Narratives 1995–2000 by NESFA Press Guest (in memoriam) Gardner Dozois at the Boskone Book Party, on Saturday, February 16, at 6:30 pm, in the Galleria.

On the Road with Gardner Dozois: Travel Narratives 1995–2000 offers an inside look at the life and experiences of one of the most important science fiction editors of our time. Gardner Dozois shares his insights and observations of science fiction, fannish tourist travel, and world class conventions in this special selection of trip reports when the genre was on the cusp of change. This historical snapshot captures Gardner’s award-winning convention experiences as he and his wife Susan set out on their vacation adventures to various Worldcons, the Nebula Awards, and Westercon in the late 1990s. Each trip report includes a memory of Gardner shared by his friends who knew him best as he shares his own unique view of the world, fandom, and the authors who helped to bring science fiction and its conventions into the Twenty-First Century.

“Gardner writes far and away the best trip reports in fandom. Gardner’s accounts of his travels remind me of the work of the top best travel writers. He can describe the sights and smells of a foreign land as vividly as Paul Theroux, and he makes his own adventures as funny as P.J. O’Rourke.” — George R.R. Martin


Register for Boskone 56 today!

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B56 Mini Interview with William Hayashi, Sarah Smith & Jeffrey A. Carver

Welcome back to our Boskone 56 Mini Interview series! Happy Monday! And to those of you who are from New Englands, I want to extend an EXTRA Happy Monday to all of you 😉 Let’s start this week of with some interviews with William Hayashi, Sarah Smith and Jeffrey A. Carver!

William Hayashi

William Hayashi is an author, award-winning screenwriter, film producer, and host of the Genesis Science Fiction Radio Show. He has published a number of novels and short stories, and his first four movie scripts were made into films. His seminal work was The Darkside Trilogy, telling the story of what happens in the U.S. when African Americans are discovered secretly living on the backside of the moon since before Neil Armstrong arrived. His followup to Darkside is The Archangel-X Trilogy which continues the story of Darkside several years later.

Visit William on his Facebook, Twitter, and Website!

With many conventions to choose from and limited time in your schedule, what attracts you to Boskone?

The first feature of this convention that resonates especially with me is the comprehensive program that the committee manages to put together year after year.

If you could relive your first experience with any book or film, which one would you pick? What is it about this book or film that you want to experience again for the “first time?”

Thinking back so many years and thousands of books ago I think it was reading Frank Herbert’s Dune for the first time. The scope of the store, the futuristic aspects, the complexity of the plot, and the incorporation of political intrigue was something I had not found in any other book, let alone a series, before.

What is your favorite memory of a fan interaction at a convention? It could be you as a pro interacting with one of your fans or you as a fan meeting someone you admire.

I was in conversation with several people at Boskone 54 and heard someone call out my name behind me. It was a woman I did not know who wanted to compliment me on the moderation I did at Boskone and WorldCon for the AfroFuturism panels at both conventions. She stated that whatever panels I was on, she was going to be sure to attend.

Can you share some details about upcoming projects or what you’re working on now? Do you have releases in 2019 that readers should look for?

I am in the last stages of completing a second series, The Archangel-X Trilogy, consisting of volumes Quarantine, Enmity, and Enlightenment, to be released all at once in the first or second quarter of 2019. I also have a Young Adult novel that will follow, hopefully, by the Labor Day holiday. In July, two literary organizations in Portland, Oregon are putting together a weekend’s worth of programs with me as the headliner. I will be discussing my work, world building, character construction, and several aspects of crafting compelling stories.

Sarah Smith

Sarah Smith writes things, including an Edwardian mystery series. She’s working on a fantasy set in an alternate 19C Brazil. For fun she fixes Victorian things, IRL she works in online education. For fun, virtual chocolate, and short stories, visit http://www.sarahsmith.com, FB and Twitter sarahwriter

Visit Sarah on her Facebook, Twitter, Website, Pinterest, and Instagram!

In 10 words or less, how would you recommend Boskone to a friend or fan?

SF in the snow–pros, programming, fine art, friends.

If you could relive your first experience with any book or film, which one would you pick? What is it about this book or film that you want to experience again for the “first time?”

The very first book I consciously fell in love with was T.H. White’s MISTRESS MASHAM’S REPOSE. I was at my aunt’s, the only child at a party, and found it on her bookshelves. I fell entirely into the book–that strange, postwar-Victorian world of Malplaquet; Maria, doughty heroine in her boots and glasses; the villainous Vicar and Mrs. Brown; the Professor; Mrs. Nokes, riding her bicycle down the halls of the gigantic house; the dog, Captain; and, of course, the Lilliputians. All of them beautifully brought to life, with grownup jokes and adventure and perfect illustrations by Fritz Eichenberg.

I wouldn’t go home until she let me borrow it. (She gave it to me, wise woman. I still have it.)

So the book I’m always looking for is the one that’s better written than it needs to be; where the characters are in trouble, yearning for something better, something just and fair and kind; a book set in a strange world that feels like home. Usually that book is fantasy or historical fiction. It’s not always a kind world but it’s unique, and the characters are passionate people fighting for high stakes. Jo Walton’s FARTHING, THE HUNGER GAMES, Harry Potter, Ysabeau Wilce’s FLORA SEGUNDA, any Miles Vorkosigan book–I think the first one I read was was “The Mountains of Mourning”–Brian Selznick’s THE ADVENTURES OF HUGO CABRET (and the movie too), Malka Older’s Centenal books, Barbara Hambly’s DRAGONSBANE and the Benjamin January books, anything by Angela Carter. Mikhail Bulgakov’s THE MASTER AND MARGARITA….So many books to love. Most recently Robin Sloan’s MR PENUMBRA’S 24-HOUR BOOKSTORE.

They say you can find hints of creators in their work. Looking back at your work, which character, piece of art, song, poem, article, etc. most closely resembles you? Why?

(Insert standard “They’re all me” here.) Like Alexander von Reisden, I had a very difficult relationship with my family of origin. Like Perdita Halley, I have/had a disability: she’s legally blind, I had a severe speech defect. Like Joe Roper, I was a graduate student on a working-class budget. But the one that most closely resembles me? Law Walker in THE OTHER SIDE OF DARK. Not because I’m a rich mixed-race teenager, or because his father is a bully (though I’ve been there). He and I are both huge fans of old architecture.

There’s a moment when Law looks into the chimney closet of an eighteenth-century house and realizes that the other wall of the closet is the fireplace of another room; the whole house turns inside out for him, he understands how it works, the house in its garden; he stands at the center of it and his understanding radiates out, and he knows he’s never going to be bored again. Me. I did that first.

It’s not as though characters *are* you; rather, something in their experience is like something in your experience, and it starts up a whole conversation between you and them about how they feel and how it affects them because of who they are.

Do you have a favorite photo from a book event or literary convention? If so, when and where was it taken? What do you enjoy most about this photo?

Books are never done till readers read them. I love to hear from readers and talk with them. This was taken at Malice Domestic in 2010. I was talking with a reader/fan about a book of mine, which was up for an award. It got it, and she was even happier than I was!

Can you share some details about upcoming projects or what you’re working on now? Do you have releases in 2019 that readers should look for?

Three big projects: The Titanic book has a title, CRIMES AND SURVIVORS. My agent and I are working on various schemes for publishing it and republishing the 3 other Reisden-Perdita novels. There are some interesting nibbles, but if nothing comes of them, we’ll do Kindle Direct.

I’m working on a big fat fantasy, working title ICARU, set in a fantasticated Brazil.

Finally, a group of the Future Boston writers and others are collaborating on a shared-universe project, which may lead to more Future Boston.stories. Meanwhile FUTURE BOSTON, SLOW LIGHTNING, and IN THE CUBE are going to be republished, together with a new novel, Jon Burrowes’ VUBRE THE GREAT.

Who is your favorite literary character of all time? What is it about this character that you admire?

No points for originality here: Terry Pratchett’s Death, especially in HOGFATHER. But usually my favorite literary characters are the ones in the book(s) I’m working on.

Jeffrey A. Carver

Jeffrey A. Carver was a Nebula Award finalist for his novel Eternity’s End. He also authored Battlestar Galactica, a novelization of the critically acclaimed television miniseries. His novels combine thought-provoking characters with engaging storytelling, and range from the adventures of the Star Rigger universe (Star Rigger’s Way, Dragons in the Stars, and others) to the ongoing, character-driven hard SF of The Chaos Chronicles—which begins with Neptune Crossing and continues with Strange Attractors, The Infinite Sea, Sunborn, and the forthcoming The Reefs of Time. A native of Huron, Ohio, Carver lives with his family in the Boston area. He has taught writing in a variety of settings, from educational television to conferences for young writers to MIT, as well as his Ultimate Science Fiction Workshop with Craig Shaw Gardner. He has created a free web site for aspiring authors of all ages at writesf.com. Learn more about the author and his work at starrigger.net.

Visit Jeffrey on his Facebook, Website, and Blog!

With many conventions to choose from and limited time in your schedule, what attracts you to Boskone?

It’s in my home town! Plus it’s very welcoming, and I always enjoy it.

If you could relive your first experience with any book or film, which one would you pick? What is it about this book or film that you want to experience again for the “first time?”

Milton Lesser’s Stadium Beyond the Stars. I read this book at least a dozen times when I was a kid. I loved the unabashed sense of wonder at the exploration of the galaxy, first contact with cool aliens (the Rollers), and the coming together of worlds in the galactic Olympics. I loved that the hero, Steve, put humanity’s first interaction with another race above his own ambitions as an Olympics athlete. (His field was spacesuit racing.) Truth is, I loved all the Winston Juveniles with the rocket on the spine that I encountered at that age. I recently discovered that many of them are available at very low cost as ebooks, and I’ve dipped back into them. “Stadium” isn’t nearly as exciting as I remember it, so I see now how much of *me* and my own aspirations were wrapped up in my reading of it, and books like it.

They say you can find hints of creators in their work. Looking back at your work, which character, piece of art, song, poem, article, etc. most closely resembles you? Why?

Depends on my stage of life. I have been told that Gev Carlyle of Star Rigger’s Way seems like me. The whole notion of a star rigger (pilot) crafting fantastic landscapes in the net to enable navigation through the tricksy currents of the interstellar Flux seems a lot like a young writer crafting visions of wondrous worlds and navigating stories through them. Or so I was told; I didn’t think of it that way at all as I was writing it. But yeah.

On the other hand, at a slightly later date, I channeled a good deal of Panglor Balef, who was more than a little crazy and pretty unhappy with his lot in life.

On the other other hand, Ed the virtual cyberparrot in the dragon books really bounced off the virtual walls in a way that some part of me wanted to.

Shall I go on? Can you share some details about upcoming projects or what you’re working on now? Do you have releases in 2019 that readers should look for?

I have FINALLY, after more than ten years, completed the next volume(s) of The Chaos Chronicles, entitled The Reefs of Time! It’s getting its finishing touches put on right now. Nothing definite about a publication date, but I’ll let the world know as soon as I know.

Who is your favorite literary character of all time? What is it about this character that you admire?

Gandalf, hands down. Do I really need to say more?


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